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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
for detroit. 20 10 air cargo threat as well as other plots that were effectively mitigated. some more international in scope and origin like the christmas they plot was involved a nigerian citizen who purchased his ticket in ghama,. flew from legos to amsterdam and attended to ignite a bomb en route to america. that attempted attack, we learned that relevant information possessed by u.s. customs and border protection needed to be available overseas at the last point of departure for the united states. we fixed that. we learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am
it in ohio, detroit, pennsylvania. >> they're doing it in texas. >> it would create jobs. so many opportunities for all americans. there is your answer. >> i want to add one point. i lived in atlanta. the day i arrived in atlanta, my first day on the air i got a call from maynar, d jackson. i got to know andrew young, josea williams. martin luther king's driver. i got to know these guys. what they did many the face of such hostility is an amazing profile in courage. what they did made this country better. >> absolutely. >> the president gave a good speech today, bob. one of the best speeches i have heard him give. >> talk about entitlements. unfortunately president obama has only expanded entitlements to make whites, blacks, hispanics more dependent. it's not helping anybody. you and i know more could be done in washington, d.c. it's cultural. when you have a president who is -- i know you don't like him. i don't like what he does. h's a good father, appearingly a good husband. there are no sex scandals. he's there for his kids. his pants are pulled up. he speaks gramattic -- corr
in new york this morning and spread across to cities like chicago, charlotte north carolina, and detroit. workers say they want to earn $15 an hour, nearly double the current minimum wage. lois is the history professor at cornell university, and she joins us now from ihnica new york. can you hear me now. >> obviously we are having a little difficult with our life feed there. question will try to come back to them later. the justice department says it will not sue the state's of colorado and washington to block them from legalized recreational marijuana use. instead, the government outlines its priorities for enforcing the laws including keeping pot out of the hands of minors and keeping the drug cart tells out. this leaves many trying to figure out how to make money off this newly legal industry. in abatement room, he gives us a small whiff of the future of big weed. >> we won some awards for this, if you smell it you will get -- blueberry cheesecake. >> this is a 500 square feet growing room, but his company is permitted for nearly 20 times that. we help provide over 10,000 patients wit
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
: and it's a dream that still lives on 50 years later. edith drove to d.c. from detroit for this week's commemoration and she brought her granddaughters with her. >> i wanted my granddaughters to see what i saw 50 years ago. to stand up for what's right. >> reporter: the struggles then and those to come draw john lewis back as well. you still come here often. >> oh, yes. >> reporter: why? >> because i come here to reflect, to remember. >> reporter: remembering his old friend, and the day that both made history and changed it. >> this spot is almost sacred. dr. king must be looked upon as one of the founding fathers of the new america. lewis believes america has come far in 50 years. many issues still exist. progress, he says, just a down payment on the dream. what was at stake that day? >> the future of america as one nation. as one people. it was at stake. he helped hold us together. >> reporter: is there one moment from that day that sticks out in your mind most? >> he started saying let freedom ring. let freedom ring. from stone mountain of georgia, let freedom ring. from every mol
in detroit to stand with those to make a difference in what was happening in the south. >> so you drove from detroit with your mom, came down here. what was this like? 50 years ago, when this mall was filled with, you were one of a quarter of a million americans. >> actually we took the greyhound bus. it was a wonderful experience. it was a very, very hot humid day but it was so incredible to see so many people fro all walks of life all standing together in unity after havg heard so many disturbances. buthere was no fr that there would be anything happening because everyone shared the same goal. >> well, it's 50 years later. it's your birthday again and now you came from detroit, drove from detroit, with your granddaughte granddaughters, why. >> i drove because i wanted my granddaughters to have the experience that i had 50 years ago. so they'll have the same kind of hope that i have for what we're facing in today's associate. >> what are your thoughts about this? you have seen the videos. you have talked to your grandmother. what are you looking forward to today? >> i'm looking forward to s
detroit, michigan, which is where i live now, but she knew and i knew from reading different publications like "jet." our black newspaper was then called "the michigan chronicle." i remember vividly seeing the picture of mr. evers after he had been killed. but growing up in the north, in detroit, i lived the dream that dr. king spoke of. i went to integrated schools. i lived in an integrated neighborhood. my friends were both white and black, all through school. it disturbed my mother and it disturbs me that people in the south had problems, they could not live the life that i lived. we dined at lunch counters and took public transportation in contrast to what you heard about rosa parks and others. we rode on the bus -- it was called the dsr then. and we would ride wherever we wanted to go and sit wherever we wanted to sit. coming to the march for us meant supporting the travesties that were happening in the south. and not just my mother and i, obviously. 250,000 people felt the same way. those that could get there. there were many who watched from their tv's at home that felt the same wa
americans died over the city of detroit. only then was that a political will to say we now need to use 21st century technology which we have against the terrorists. so if you look at it right now in a world where they only have to be right 1% of the time we have to be right 100% of the time on defense we should use one of our few at images which is technology and the vast majority of the explosive detection systems in place today aren't capable of detecting either this type of clothing soaked in liquid explosives nor are they capable of detecting even say the surgically implanted bombs or something as basic as the underwear bomber. most are designed to do -- magnetometers detect metal. that is not the explosive itself. usually the only medal medal involved as the detonator so if you are able to designed explosives with no metal detector, you effectively have made that system. we are living in the stone age's on most of the magnetometer technology we are using. our one advantage which is bring for this modern advanced imaging technology to allow us to level the playing field in the last thin
, the epa, the irs, the justice department to go on and on and on. it's like they want us to be detroit. we didn't vote for him. he got no votes from the state, thank you, oklahoma. but we are paying for it. and he doesn't end run around everybody. what can we do to get oklahomans working, to get these things implemented without him sitting up there and saying, this is what you're going to do, instead of the people that own this country telling them? [applause] >> you know, i would kill you don't blame it all on obama because they were uncontrolled bureaucracies under george bush. i expense them, and he did, too. he goes back to the thing we kind of started out with, is the federal government is out of control. but it's been predicted by all the historians that our republic will fail. so the question is how do we cheat history? how do we go back? how do we really base -- we embrace the things that made america great. as i said earlier i think we have to get in charge. i've been working for nine years to try to make a big difference. i have made a small difference, not a bi big difference. b
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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